RCMP warned Lisa's parents for seeking answers on their own

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Summary

Frustrated with the RCMP's lack of progress, Lisa's parents worked to find answers on their own — RCMP repeatedly warned them against continuing their investigative efforts.

Detail

He was released shortly after, though the RCMP told the Youngs they were sure he was withholding information critical to the case.
Ha-Shilth-Sa, August 14, 2003 (Ruth Olgilvie)[1]
Two officers from the Nanaimo detachment showed up at their house, warning Don they would charge him with obstruction of justice if pursued media coverage.
Ha-Shilth-Sa, August 14, 2003 (Ruth Olgilvie)[1]

RCMP investigators questioned the driver of the Jaguar in which Lisa was last seen, and he was then released, though the RCMP told Lisa’s parents that they were sure he was withholding information critical to the case. Lisa’s father was distraught and prepared to alert the media about the man's release. Two officers from the Nanaimo detachment showed up at their home, warning Don they would charge him with obstruction of justice if he pursued media coverage. RCMP said they did not want the Youngs "interfering with the integrity of the RCMP". [1]

Joanne was warned… on RCMP letterhead for telling one Nanaimo paper about the man who was taken into custody then released.
Ha-Shilth-Sa, August 14, 2003 (Ruth Olgilvie)[1]

"Suffice to say we feel strongly about an individual, but there isn't sufficient evidence to charge him," stated Nanaimo RCMP Sgt. Chisholm. "I hesitate greatly to discuss this as there hasn't been sufficient evidence to charge anyone." However, RCMP admitted to believing there is a connection between Lisa's disappearance and the individual. Joanne was warned on a separate occasion via a letter on RCMP letterhead for telling a Nanaimo newspaper about the man who was taken into custody and then released.[1]

At one time her husband began e-mailing the grandparent, until he was warned off by the RCMP.
Times Colonist, April 4, 2004 (Jim Gibson)[2]

Lisa’s parents knew the identity of the driver only because RCMP investigators brought Lisa’s mother to the Parksville detachment where the man was being questioned, and told her to hug the man.[3]

Lisa’s parents have photos of the Jaguar which Lisa’s mother had snapped from the street outside the Qualicum Beach house where the car owner — the driver's grandmother — lived. At one time Lisa’s father began emailing the grandmother until he was warned off by the RCMP. [2]

The new [posters] would name the driver. RCMP ahead the Youngs not to do this. Last January the Youngs went ahead anyway.
Times Colonist, April 4, 2004 (Jim Gibson)[2]
Missing poster including a picture of the Jaguar and naming the driver.
"Missing" poster where Lisa's parents included a photo of the Jaguar, and the driver's name.[4]

Don warned investigators that he was planning to update the “missing” posters to include the driver’s name and a photo of the car. RCMP investigators warned him not to do this. In January 2003, he went ahead anyway. [2][3][4]

Sources

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 Ruth Olgilvie, Ha-Shilth-Sa (Aug 14, 2003), Investigation for missing woman frustrates family hss20030814
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 Jim Gibson, Times Colonist (Apr 4, 2004), The case Nanaimo can't forget tc20040404
  3. 3.0 3.1 Jim Gibson, Calgary Herald (Apr 18, 2004), Lisa Marie Young: Vanished ch20040418
  4. 4.0 4.1 CaseWarriors, Missing Poster: Lisa Marie Young (Source)